Open Source Android Apps for Developers: Android-passwordsafe

Apps Description
Android-passwordsafe (A password safe for Android) is an open source Android application which protects your passwords with AES encryption. All encrypted information is stored in a database on the phone. No information is kept online. The only way to backup currently is through the export feature.

Please note that As of February 3rd, 2009, Android Password Safe has merged with OpenIntents. Please see either http://www.openintents.org/en/node/205/ or http://code.google.com/p/openintents/

Project Home
http://code.google.com/p/android-passwordsafe/

Project owners
osborn.steven, rmceoin

Version
0.5

Downloads
http://code.google.com/p/android-passwordsafe/downloads/detail?name=android-passwordsafe-0.5.0_signed.apk

Source Code
# Non-members may check out a read-only working copy anonymously over HTTP.
svn checkout http://android-passwordsafe.googlecode.com/svn/trunk/ android-passwordsafe-read-only

ImportExport
How-to Import/Export your password data into Android Password Safe

Note that the import and export commands generate and operate on unencrypted data. That means that an unencrypted version of your password file will live on your SD card (and perhaps your desktop computer). You will probably either want to delete these files or encrypt them by some other means in order maintain the level of security offered by Android Password Safe’s Encryption capabilities.

Export
1. Make sure the G1 is not connected via the USB cable.
2. From the Categories screen, select the menu item Export Database.
3. The file “passwordsafe.csv” will be created on the SD card.
4. Connect the G1 to your computer with the USB cable.
5. Look for “passwordsafe.csv” in the base directory of the USB storage.
6. Note that this file is unencrypted, and you may want to delete it later.

Import
1. On your computer, use a spreadsheet program like Excel.
2. Create the following headers in row 1:

“Category”,”Description”,”Website”,”Username”,”Password”,”Notes”

3. In rows 2 and lower, add your appropriate data.
4. Perform a “Save As..” with a name of “passwordsafe.csv” and type of “CSV”.
5. Connect the G1 to your computer with the USB cable.
6. Copy “passwordsafe.csv” onto the base directory of the USB storage on your G1.
7. Disconnect the USB cable.
8. On the G1 in Password Safe, from the Categories screen, select the menu item Import Database.
9. Your first prompt will ask “Do you want to replace the database?”. Answer Yes or No.
* Answering Yes will delete all data currently in Password Safe and replace it with the CSV data.
* Answering No will effectively append the new data.
10. After you have verified that your data has been imported successfully, you may want to delete any unencrypted copies of this file that you may have created.

About AES encryption
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

In cryptography, the Advanced Encryption Standard (AES) is a symmetric-key encryption standard adopted by the U.S. government. The standard comprises three block ciphers, AES-128, AES-192 and AES-256, adopted from a larger collection originally published as Rijndael. Each of these ciphers has a 128-bit block size, with key sizes of 128, 192 and 256 bits, respectively. The AES ciphers have been analyzed extensively and are now used worldwide, as was the case with its predecessor, the Data Encryption Standard (DES).

AES was announced by National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) as U.S. FIPS PUB 197 (FIPS 197) on November 26, 2001 after a 5-year standardization process in which fifteen competing designs were presented and evaluated before Rijndael was selected as the most suitable (see Advanced Encryption Standard process for more details). It became effective as a Federal government standard on May 26, 2002 after approval by the Secretary of Commerce. It is available in many different encryption packages. AES is the first publicly accessible and open cipher approved by the NSA for top secret information (see Security of AES, below).

The Rijndael cipher was developed by two Belgian cryptographers, Joan Daemen and Vincent Rijmen, and submitted by them to the AES selection process. Rijndael (pronounced [rɛindaːl]) is a wordplay with the names of the two inventors

Posted by Cute Android

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